Art for Inspiration: Young Girl Carrying a Pumpkin by Fausto Zonaro

Young Girl Carrying a Pumpkin, 1889
by Fausto Zonaro (1854 – 1929)

Before the fruits of prosperity can come, the storms of life need to first bring the required rains of testing, which mixes with the seeds of wisdom to produce a mature harvest.
Lincoln Patz

We were put on this magical planet, not to dominate and consume her, but to care for her and love her. To harrow gently. To harvest gratefully. To build reasonably.
David Paul Kirkpatrick

In life, we plant seeds everywhere we go.
Some fall on fertile ground needing very little to grow.
Some fall on rocky soil requiring a tad bit more loving care.
While others fall in seemingly barren land and no matter what you do; it appears the seed is dead.

Nevertheless, every seed planted will have a ripple effect.
You could see it in the present or a time not seen yet.
So be wise about where you plant your seeds.
Be very mindful of your actions and deeds.
Negativity grows just as fast if not faster than positivity.
Plant seeds of kindness, love and peace
And your harvest will be abundant living.
Sanjo Jendayi

Art for Inspiration: Green Lattice by Charles Courtney Curran

Green Lattice, 1919
by Charles Courtney Curran (1861 - 1942)

I don’t know what’s worse: to not know what you are and be happy, or to become what you’ve always wanted to be, and feel alone.
Daniel Keyes, Flowers for Algernon

I go to sleep alone, and wake up alone. I take walks. I work until I'm tired. I watch the wind play with the trash that's been under the snow all winter. Everything seems simple until you think about it. Why is love intensified by abscence?
Audrey Niffenegger, The Time Traveler's Wife

You felt a deep sorrow, the kind of melancholy you feel when you're in a beautiful place and the sun is going down.
Thrity Umrigar, The Space Between Us

Art for Inspiration: Garden Scenes by Alfonse Van Besten

Ma femme (Mrs. A. Van Besten), 1913

Blossom and lady, ca. 1913

Young girl amidst marguerites, ca. 1912

Van Besten painting in his garden, 1909

A series of photographs from the early 20th century by Belgian artist Alfonse Van Besten (1865 - 1926). Van Besten was a painter and many of his autochromes were taken with a "painterly eye." You can find many more of his autochrome photographs on the Belgian Autochromists website here.

Antique Illustration for Crafts, Garden Journal, Scrapbook Page or Card Making: Ladies in the Garden 2

When you feel as if you should conform and be like everyone else....
Remember that you were born to stand out
and be your uniquely beautiful and talented self.
Nanette Mathews

A quartet of young ladies standing around a garden terrace overooking a lovely lake with white swans. You can download the 8.5" x 11" @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark here. Can be used in craft projects, garden journals, scrapbook pages or for graphic design.

Creative Commons Licence
All digital scans by FieldandGarden.com are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Where possible, please cite FieldandGarden.com as your source when using this work and/or provide a link back to this page.

Free Flower Clipart for Crafts, Scrapbooking or Graphic Design: Distressed Red & Bronze Rose w/ Worn Border (Digital Ephemera)


"There is no pretending," Jace said with absolute clarity.
"I love you, and I will love you until I die,
and if there is life after that, I'll love you then.”
Cassandra Clare, City of Glass

“I heard what you said. I’m not the silly romantic you think.
I don’t want the heavens or the shooting stars. I don’t want gemstones or gold.
I have those things already. I want…a steady hand. A kind soul.
I want to fall asleep, and wake, knowing my heart is safe. I want to love, and be loved.”
Shana Abe

Illustration of a red and bronze rose from a 1909 vintage postcard. I have left most of the distressed paper elements intact on this one as I feel it gives the image an aged quality perfect for vintage-style crafts, scrapbooking or graphic design projects. To download the high-res 9" x 6" @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark, please click here.

Creative Commons Licence
All digital scans by FieldandGarden.com are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Where possible, please cite FieldandGarden.com as your source when using this work and/or provide a link back to this page.

Art for Inspiration: Sunlit Conservatory with Parrots by Olga Wisinger-Florian

Sunlit Conservatory with Parrots
by Olga Wisinger-Florian (1844 - 1926)

Most things are forgotten over time. Even the war itself, the life-and-death struggle people went through is now like something from the distant past. We’re so caught up in our everyday lives that events of the past are no longer in orbit around our minds. There are just too many things we have to think about everyday, too many new things we have to learn. But still, no matter how much time passes, no matter what takes place in the interim, there are some things we can never assign to oblivion, memories we can never rub away. They remain with us forever, like a touchstone.
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

“Sometimes," he sighed, "I think the things I remember are more real than the things I see.”
Arthur Golden, Memoirs of a Geisha

“But that's how memory works," Bitterblue said quietly. "Things disappear without your permission, then come back again without your permission. And sometimes they came back incomplete and warped.”
Kristin Cashore, Bitterblue

Art for Inspiration: The Garden Parasol by Frederick Carl Frieseke

"The Garden Parasol," c1910
by Frederick Carl Frieseke (1874 - 1939)

Tris: I was reading.
Sandry: You're always reading. The only way people can ever talk to you is to interrupt.
Tris: Then maybe they shouldn't talk to me.
Tamora Pierce, Briar's Book

Life is a series of natural and spontaneous changes. Don't resist them; that only creates sorrow. Let reality be reality. Let things flow naturally forward in whatever way they like.
Lao Tzu

St. Augustine said, "The very pleasures of human life men acquire by difficulties." There are times when the entire arrangement of our existence is disrupted and we long then for just one ordinary day - seeing our ordinary life as greatly desirable, even wonderful, in the light of the terrible disruption that has taken place. Difficulty opens our eyes to pleasures we had taken for granted.
Elisabeth Elliot, Keep a Quiet Heart

Vintage Outdoor Graphic for Walk Journal, Scrapbooking, Card Making or Graphic Design: Ladies with Umbrellas 1


If you are in a bad mood, go for a walk.
If you are still in a bad mood, go for another walk.
Hippocrates

An antique engraving in colour from April 1904 that shows two Edwardian ladies in their spring dresses out for a walk around the park or garden. Both ladies are carrying umbrellas, quite prepared to fend off any April showers. You can download the free high-res 8" x 11" @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark for use in a walk journal, collage art making, scrapbooking or card design projects here.

Creative Commons Licence
All digital scans by FieldandGarden.com are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Please cite FieldandGarden.com as your source when using this work and/or provide a link back to this page.

Art for Inspiration: A Stroll in the Park by William James Glackens

“A Stroll in the Park," c1915
by William James Glackens (1870-1938)

“I dressed and went for a walk - determined not to return until I took in what Nature had to offer.”
Raymond Carver, This Morning

“If you seek creative ideas go walking.
Angels whisper to a man when he goes for a walk.”
Raymond I. Myers

“[Walking] is the perfect way of moving if you want to see into the life of things. It is the one way of freedom. If you go to a place on anything but your own feet you are taken there too fast, and miss a thousand delicate joys that were waiting for you by the wayside.”
Elizabeth von Arnim, The Adventures of Elizabeth in Rügen

Free Illustrated Template with Old Paper Texture for Walk / Hiking Journal or Travel Notes - 1


I might walk vast expanses of earth and
always be beginning and I love beginning
or could learn to love it.
S. Jane Sloat

A walk journal (or travel diary) template on old paper texture with an illustration of two Victorian ladies, one of whom is carrying a parasol. You can download the high-res 11" x 8.5" @ 300 ppi JPEG here.

Creative Commons Licence
All digital scans by FieldandGarden.com are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Please cite FieldandGarden.com as your source when using this work and/or provide a link back to this page.

Art Appreciation: A Walk in the Pumpkin Patch with M. Evelyn McCormick

In keeping with the harvest season, I decided to feature a couple of M. Evelyn McCormick's paintings with pumpkins. Evelyn McCormick was an American Impressionist painter who lived and worked around San Francisco and Monterey, California at the turn of the 20th century. This intrepid Bohemian travelled to Paris, France in the 1880s to be with her lover, Guy Rose, also a painter. They both spent much time painting in the village of Giverny where they were influenced by the great Claude Monet.

Mary Evelyn McCormick (December 2, 1862 – May 6, 1948)

This look at a corner of "A Garden in Giverny" made me think of the pumpkins we once tried to grow in our community garden plot - lots of aggressive leaves and vines but not-so-spectacular pumpkins. There is a charming air of country derelict in this overgrown garden with its tumbledown walls, a dying tree, and all sorts of interesting vegetation rooting everywhere. It feels like the kind of spot that a child might think of hiding in when playing hide-and-seek.

"A Garden in Giverny," 1891

Almost 20 years later, back in California, McCormick painted this patch of pumpkins growing on a slope above a pond or stream in the Carmel Valley. The setting under an open sky, wide swaths of greenery and almost-still water feels more expansive than the semi-enclosed, intimate space of the first garden scene. The second image is also a more formal rendering of a landscape, evocative of a prosperous farm, with its lush, neat fields and convenient footpaths. There is almost a sense that perhaps McCormick is trying to convey the idea of an agrarian idyll for her viewers.

"Carmel Valley Pumpkins," c1907

I confess that I'm drawn to the first painting more, despite the rough state of the garden. The atmosphere is relaxed; you don't have to worry about weeding or planning neat borders. You can graze on a berry or a bean should you come across one, and you can pick a couple of pumpkins to tide you over winter. What about you? How do you feel when you look at the paintings? Do they evoke memories for you? Feel free to share your thoughts in the comments below.

© 2018 FieldandGarden.com. All rights reserved.

Digital Ephemera for Crafts, Collage, Scrapbooking or Card Making: The Snake and the Hummingbird (Natural History, Instant Download)


Perhaps it takes courage to raise children..
John Steinbeck, East of Eden

Behind all your stories is always your mother's story. Because hers is where yours begin.
Mitch Albom, For One More Day

Antique engraving originally published in December 1878. This illustration shows a mother hummingbird fiercely defending her nest against a snake who is hoping to feast on her helpless baby. Can this battle end happily for the avian family? You can download this free high-res 8" x 8" @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark for crafts, collage, scrapbooking or graphic design projects here.

Creative Commons Licence
All digital scans by FieldandGarden.com are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Where possible, please cite FieldandGarden.com as your source when using this work and/or provide a link back to this page.

Art Appreciation: Celebrating Fall Colour with Franz Bischoff

"Autumn Moods" by Franz Arthur Bischoff (1864 - 1929)

Franz Bischoff was born in Austria but immigrated to the United States in 1882. Trained in ceramic decoration as a boy, he continued to further his career in porcelain painting in his new homeland. He became well-known as a leading teacher of the craft, founding the Bischoff School of Ceramic Art in Detroit and in New York City, and as a master ceramicist who manufactured many of his own glazes.

Vase decorated by Bischoff (acclaimed as "King of the Rose Painters")

He decided to settle in California in 1906, ultimately building and completing a landmark studio home at 320 Pasadena Avenue in 1908. A description of the home says: "The building was poured of solid concrete and was one-and-a half stories high. It was designed in the Renaissance style, with an imposing entry through massive oak doors with stained glass panels. The doorway was set beneath a classical pedimented portico, supported by two columns. The interior was divided between a large gallery, a studio and a complete ceramic workshop in the basement.

The gallery measured 36 feet by 40 feet. It had high, concave ceilings lighted by several half-circle skylights. The floors were of solid oak covered by old Turkish rugs and polar bear skins. All interior doors and paneling were of natural redwood in the Gothic style. The furniture was of massive oak in the Mission style. At the west end of the gallery was a huge tile-covered fireplace. The wall space throughout was covered with paintings of flowers and landscapes, and in one corner were several oak display cases containing examples of Bischoff's painted ceramics.

The painting studio had a large picture window that overlooked the Arroyo Seco, with a wide vista of the distant mountains. The studio furniture consisted of an easel, several easy chairs and low divans, all of Flemish oak."

"The Arroyo Seco, Pasadena," c1918 by Franz Bischoff
- a possible view from his studio window?

In 1912, Bischoff went on an extended tour of Europe where he studied the works of the Old Masters and the Impressionists. On his return to California, Bischoff turned to landscape painting and gradually abandoned porcelain decoration (Source: The Irvine Museum).

Although I've categorized Bischoff's works under Impressionism, I think they more accurately fall somewhere in between Impressionism and Fauvism, particularly his later works (c1920s) which show very strong, vivid colours. His background in design comes through his compositions - look how his landscapes follow clearly the rules of linear perspective, and he seems to have retained quite a bit of art nouveau graphical influence in his stylized renderings of landscape elements such as trees, rocks and mountains. This unique treatment, in addition to his use of jewel-like colour blocks, makes me feel like I'm looking st a Tiffany stained glass window.

Autumn landscape window from Tiffany Studios (1902 - 1932),
design attributed to Agnes F. Northrop (1857 - 1953) (Source: The Met)

Finally, I am closing the post with two Bischoff paintings of fall's most popular flowers - the quintessential chrysanthemums!

"Chrysanthemums" by Franz Bischoff

"Spider Mums" by Franz Bischoff

Aren't these warm colours lovely? I hope you have the opportunity of using these golden hues in your fall decorating to stave off the encroaching cooler temperatures. Pretty soon, possibly after Halloween, I'll be filling up the house and front yard with more blue-greens and reds as we head into the Christmas season but it is really nice to savour the yellows, oranges, and golds while summer is still fresh in our minds.

© 2018 FieldandGarden.com. All rights reserved.

Antique Printable Illustration for DIY Wall Art, Scrapbooking or Graphic Design: Elegant Lady in the Garden 1


There are times when we stop, we sit still.
We listen and breezes from a whole other world begin to whisper.
James Carroll

First-generation digital scan of a black and white engraving from August 3, 1873. The illustration shows a fashionable Victorian woman sitting on her terrace, enjoying the fresh air under the protection of her parasol. Surrounding her is lush summer greenery, growing with wild abandon. The outfit was supplied by Mme. Fladry, located at rue Richelieu, 43 in Paris. You can download the 6.25" x 9" @ 300 ppi JPEG for crafts, collage, scrapbooking or card making here.

Creative Commons Licence
All digital scans by FieldandGarden.com are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Where possible, please cite FieldandGarden.com as your source when using this work and/or provide a link back to this page.

Art for Inspiration: She Loves Butter by Arthur Drummond

“She Loves Butter," 1895
by Arthur Drummond (1871 - 1957)

My world was very limited in size and experience. Small things took on extra importance, at least to a child.
Dan Groat, An Enigmatic Escape: A Trilogy

I do not miss childhood, but I miss the way I took pleasure in small things, even as greater things crumbled. I could not control the world I was in, could not walk away from things or people or moments that hurt, but I took joy in the things that made me happy.
Neil Gaiman, The Ocean at the End of the Lane

Summer will end soon enough, and childhood as well.
George R.R. Martin, A Game of Thrones

Art for Inspiration: A Rooftop with Flowers by Joaquín Sorolla

"A Rooftop with Flowers," 1906
by Joaquín Sorolla (1863 – 1923)

Every time I imagine a garden in an architectural setting,
it turns into a magical place.
I think of gardens I have seen,
that I believe I have seen, that I long to see,
surrounded by simple walls, columns, arcades or the facades of buildings -
sheltered places of great intimacy where I want to stay for a long time.
Peter Zumthor

Perhaps love is like a resting place, a shelter from the storm.
It exists to give you comfort, it is there to keep you warm,
and in those times of trouble when you are most alone,
the memory of love will bring you home.
John Denver

HIDEAWAY
Preserve that
secret, homey spot
in your heart,
as sanctuary
where dreams may be softly tended,
and revived.
Tara Estacaan

Vintage Flower Illustrations for Art Making, Scrapbooking or Graphic Design: Botanical Forms 1


“Sometimes I wish I could photosynthesize so that just by being,
just by shimmering at the meadow's edge or floating lazily on a pond,
I could be doing the work of the world while standing silent in the sun.”
Robin Wall Kimmerer, Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom,
Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants

Botanical illustrations from an antique encyclopedia. Among the plants shown are Philadelphus coronarius (sweet mock-orange or English dogwood), a stonecrop, sickle-shaped Mesembryanthemum and a New Holland pitcher plant. You could team the entire sheet with an old paper texture (or overlay several textures for an even more interesting effect) and frame as DIY wall art, or use each flower graphic separately to accent scrapbooking or graphic design projects. You can download the high-res 10" x 10.5" @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark here.

Creative Commons Licence
All digital scans by FieldandGarden.com are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Where possible, please cite FieldandGarden.com as your source when using this work and/or provide a link back to this page.

Art for Inspiration: Mercie Cutting Flowers by Edmund Charles Tarbell

"Mercie Cutting Flowers," 1912
by Edmund Charles Tarbell (1862 - 1938)

“In joy or sadness flowers are our constant friends.”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book Of Tea

“I read somewhere once that souls were like flowers,' said Priscilla.
'Then your soul is a golden narcissus,' said Anne, 'and Diana's is like a red, red rose. Jane's is an apple blossom, pink and wholesome and sweet.'
'And our own is a white violet, with purple streaks in its heart,' finished Priscilla.”
L.M. Montgomery, Anne of Avonlea

Happiness held is the seed; Happiness shared is the flower.
John Harrigan

Free Vintage Flower Clipart for Crafts, Scrapooking or Card Making: Charming Castle by a Lake Surrounded by Wreath of Roses


Romance is the glamour which turns the dust of everyday life into a golden haze.
Elinor Glyn

A vintage graphic from an early 20th century postcard in my collection. This one shows a pen and ink drawing of a fairytale castle by a lake, enclosed within a wreath of roses. Isn't it such a marvelously romantic picture for a wedding or engagement card? You can download this free illustration as a 6” x 6” @ 300 ppi JPEG (without a watermark) for crafts, scrapbooking and other graphic design projects here.

Creative Commons Licence
All digital scans by FieldandGarden.com are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Where possible, please cite FieldandGarden.com as your source when using this work and/or provide a link back to this page.

Vintage Nature Clipart for Crafts, Collage, Scrapbooking or Card Making: Frolic, the White Squirrel

“Animals are such agreeable friends - they ask no questions, they pass no criticisms.”
George Eliot, Mr Gilfil's Love Story

This illustration originally appeared in the December 1904 issue of St. Nicholas Magazine. Drawn by Meredith Nugent, it shows Frolic, a young albino squirrel that became a much-loved family pet. "In June, he stained his paws with strawberries; in August he feasted on mushrooms; and during winter birch buds fresh from the snowy woods were always a great treat." You can download a 6" x 6" @ 300 ppi JPEG for collage, scrapbooking or card making projects here.

Creative Commons Licence
All digital scans by FieldandGarden.com are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Where possible, please cite FieldandGarden.com as your source when using this work and/or provide a link back to this page.

Art for Inspiration: Ephemeral Joy by Charles Edward Perugini

"Ephemeral Joy," 1901
by Charles Edward Perugini (1839–1918)

Some of you say, “Joy is greater than sorrow,” and others say, “Nay, sorrow is the greater.”
But I say unto you, they are inseparable.
Together they come, and when one sits alone with you at your board, remember that the other is asleep upon your bed.
Kahlil Gibran, The Prophet

In fact no one recognizes the happiest moment of their lives as they are living it. It may well be that, in a moment of joy, one might sincerely believe that they are living that golden instant "now," even having lived such a moment before, but whatever they say, in one part of their hearts they still believe in the certainty of a happier moment to come. Because how could anyone, and particularly anyone who is still young, carry on with the belief that everything could only get worse: If a person is happy enough to think he has reached the happiest moment of his life, he will be hopeful enough to believe his future will be just as beautiful, more so.
Orhan Pamuk, The Museum of Innocence

Know that joy is rarer, more difficult, and more beautiful than sadness. Once you make this all-important discovery, you must embrace joy as a moral obligation.
André Gide

Art for Inspiration: The Magic Swan by Konstantín Vasilyev

The Magic Swan
by Konstantín Vasilyev (1942 – 1976)

The more often we see the things around us - even the beautiful and wonderful things - the more they become invisible to us. That is why we often take for granted the beauty of this world: the flowers, the trees, the birds, the clouds - even those we love. Because we see things so often, we see them less and less.
Joseph B. Wirthlin

It is not so much for its beauty that the forest makes a claim upon men's hearts, as for that subtle something, that quality of air that emanation from old trees, that so wonderfully changes and renews a weary spirit.
Robert Louis Stevenson

Her thoughts came to life in the stillness of the wood, nurtured by the air and the scent and the vividness of it.
Meagan Spooner, Hunted

Art for Inspiration: Untitled Landscape by Richard Heintz

Untitled Landscape
by Richard Heintz (1871 – 1929)

“Distance changes utterly when you take the world on foot. A mile becomes a long way, two miles literally considerable, ten miles whopping, fifty miles at the very limits of conception. The world, you realize, is enormous in a way that only you and a small community of fellow hikers know. Planetary scale is your little secret.

Life takes on a neat simplicity, too. Time ceases to have any meaning. When it is dark, you go to bed, and when it is light again you get up, and everything in between is just in between. It’s quite wonderful, really.

You have no engagements, commitments, obligations, or duties; no special ambitions and only the smallest, least complicated of wants; you exist in a tranquil tedium, serenely beyond the reach of exasperation, “far removed from the seats of strife,” as the early explorer and botanist William Bartram put it. All that is required of you is a willingness to trudge.

There is no point in hurrying because you are not actually going anywhere. However far or long you plod, you are always in the same place: in the woods. It’s where you were yesterday, where you will be tomorrow. The woods is one boundless singularity. Every bend in the path presents a prospect indistinguishable from every other, every glimpse into the trees the same tangled mass. For all you know, your route could describe a very large, pointless circle. In a way, it would hardly matter.

At times, you become almost certain that you slabbed this hillside three days ago, crossed this stream yesterday, clambered over this fallen tree at least twice today already. But most of the time you don’t think. No point. Instead, you exist in a kind of mobile Zen mode, your brain like a balloon tethered with string, accompanying but not actually part of the body below. Walking for hours and miles becomes as automatic, as unremarkable, as breathing. At the end of the day you don’t think, “Hey, I did sixteen miles today,” any more than you think, “Hey, I took eight-thousand breaths today.” It’s just what you do.”
Bill Bryson, A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail

Free Shabby Chic Garden Graphic for Art Making, Crafts or Scrapbooking: A Branch of Yellow Roses


“We can complain because rose bushes have thorns, or rejoice because thorns have roses.”
Alphonse Karr, A Tour Round My Garden

“True love is like little roses,
sweet, fragrant in small doses.”
Ana Claudia Antunes, Pierrot & Columbine

A branch of yellow Victorian tea roses from an 1880s trade card. To download the high-res 3" x 4.75" @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark, please click here. Great as a gift tag or card for sending to friends and loved one but can also be used in scrapbooking as well as other graphic design projects.

Creative Commons Licence
All digital scans by FieldandGarden.com are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Where possible, please cite FieldandGarden.com as your source when using this work and/or provide a link back to this page.

Free Illuminated Initial for Crafts, Scrapbooking, Card Making and Graphic Design: Upper Case T with Blooming Oriental Lily (Flower Illustration, Flower Graphic)


The light of love, the purity of grace,
The mind, the Music breathing from her face,
The heart whose softness harmonised the whole —
And, oh! that eye was in itself a Soul!
Lord Byron

From an 1893 publication, here is a beautifully illustrated capital "T" that can be used in crafts, scrapbooking, card making, bookmarks, gift tags and many other graphic design projects. To download the high-res 6.5" x 10" @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark, please click here.

Creative Commons Licence
All digital scans by FieldandGarden.com are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Please cite FieldandGarden.com as your source when using this work and/or provide a link back to this page. More detailed ToU can be found here.

Art for Inspiration: The Quiet of the Lake, Roundhay Park by John Atkinson Grimshaw

"The Quiet of the Lake, Roundhay Park," 1870
by John Atkinson Grimshaw (1836 - 1893)

You cannot wait for an untroubled world to have an untroubled moment. The terrible phone call, the rainstorm, the sinister knock on the door—they will all come. Soon enough arrive the treacherous villain and the unfair trial and the smoke and the flames of the suspicious fires to burn everything away. In the meantime, it is best to grab what wonderful moments you find lying around.
Lemony Snicket, Shouldn't You Be in School?

Therefore, dear Sir, love your solitude and try to sing out with the pain it causes you. For those who are near you are far away... and this shows that the space around you is beginning to grow vast.... be happy about your growth, in which of course you can't take anyone with you, and be gentle with those who stay behind; be confident and calm in front of them and don't torment them with your doubts and don't frighten them with your faith or joy, which they wouldn't be able to comprehend. Seek out some simple and true feeling of what you have in common with them, which doesn't necessarily have to alter when you yourself change again and again; when you see them, love life in a form that is not your own and be indulgent toward those who are growing old, who are afraid of the aloneness that you trust.... and don't expect any understanding; but believe in a love that is being stored up for you like an inheritance, and have faith that in this love there is a strength and a blessing so large that you can travel as far as you wish without having to step outside it.
Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet

I find it wholesome to be alone the greater part of the time. To be in company, even with the best, is soon wearisome and dissipating. I love to be alone. I never found the companion that was so companionable as solitude.
Henry David Thoreau, Walden

Free Botanical Illustration for Crafts, Mixed Media Art, Scrapbooking or Card Making: Fly Honeysuckle (Lonicera xylosteum)


Third and last colour plate from an antique French botany book that shows Lonicera xylosteum, also known as the fly honeysuckle. You can download this high-res printable botanical illustration (without a watermark) for craft, art making, scrapbooking or graphic design projects here. Below is a sample journal cover I made with the illustration. If you would like to use the cover, you can find the high-res JPEG here.


Creative Commons Licence
All digital scans by FieldandGarden.com are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Where possible, please cite FieldandGarden.com as your source when using this work and/or provide a link back to this page.