My Photo Journal: Free Fall (Autumn) Foliage Reference Photos for Creators and Makers

Go, sit upon the lofty hill, And turn your eyes around,
Where waving woods and waters wild
Do hymn an autumn sound.
The summer sun is faint on them —
The summer flowers depart —
Sit still — as all transform’d to stone,
Except your musing heart.
Elizabeth Barrett Browning, The Autumn

Here are four photos with fall foliage that can be used by creators and makers in their own creative projects. You can find the link to the high-res JPEG under each photo.
Fall foliage at Scarborough Bluffs, Ontario, Canada (1)
Download 6" x 9" @ 300 ppi JPEG here.
Fall foliage at Scarborough Bluffs, Ontario, Canada (2)
Download 6" x 9" @ 300 ppi JPEG here.
Fall foliage at Scarborough Bluffs, Ontario, Canada (3)
Download 6" x 9" @ 300 ppi JPEG here.
Fall foliage at Scarborough Bluffs, Ontario, Canada (4)
Download 9" x 6" @ 300 ppi JPEG here.

Creative Commons Licence
Photos © FieldandGarden.com. All rights reserved. All original photographs by FieldandGarden.com are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. You may use these images to make your own original artwork but please credit and link back to FieldandGarden.com as your source if sharing your work publicly.

Free Flower Clipart for Collage or Crafts: Distressed Red Rose with Bronze Stem

"There is no pretending," Jace said with absolute clarity.
"I love you, and I will love you until I die,
and if there is life after that, I'll love you then.”
Cassandra Clare, City of Glass

I heard what you said. I’m not the silly romantic you think.
I don’t want the heavens or the shooting stars. I don’t want gemstones or gold.
I have those things already. I want…a steady hand. A kind soul.
I want to fall asleep, and wake, knowing my heart is safe. I want to love, and be loved.
Shana Abe

Illustration of a red and bronze rose from a 1909 vintage postcard. I have left most of the distressed paper elements intact on this one as I feel it gives the image an aged quality perfect for vintage-style crafts or scrapbooking projects. To download the high-res 9" x 6" @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark, please click here.

Creative Commons Licence
From my personal collection of ephemera. All digital scans by FieldandGarden.com are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Please credit and link back to FieldandGarden.com as your source if sharing or publishing.

Public Domain Nature Poem for Kids: Apple-Tree Hall by Elizabeth Roberts Macdonald

Here is an antique children's poem of nature and imagination by Elizabeth Roberts Macdonald, published in the October 1910 issue of St. Nicholas Magazine.

APPLE-TREE HALL

There's an old spreading apple-tree, gnarly and wide,
In an orchard (I can't tell you where),
Where Dora and I can curl up side by side,
And nobody know we are there.
We go there on Saturdays, -- that's if it's fine,
And Mother is willing, and all, --
Take our dolls and our dishes, and there we keep house
Till tea-time, in Apple-Tree Hall.

There's the loveliest carpet, all wood-brown and gray,
And the walls have a pattern of green;
The windows are curtained the coziest way
That ever was thought of or seen;
And as for the ceiling, it's blue as the sky;
And we've crimson globe-lamps in the fall --
In the spring we have pink, and in summer use none
(Such a saving!), in Apple-Tree Hall.

All the neighbors are charming, -- so musical, too!
Madam Thrush has a voice like a bird,
And the love-songs she sings (in Italian, I think)
Are the sweetest we ever have heard.
Then the dryads and wood-nymphs dwell close to us, too,
Though they are too bashful to call.
The society really is quite the best
When we're living at Apple-Tree Hall.

Oh, I wish I could tell you one half of our plays,
And the fine things we plan when we're there,
Of the books that we'll write and the deeds that we'll do
In the years that wait, shining and fair.
My mother says, sometimes, -- and so does Aunt Kate, --
That these are the best days of all;
But we think it's just the beginning of fun,
Keeping house here in Apple-Tree Hall!

Creative Commons Licence
Public domain poem is fom my personal collection. All digitized poems by FieldandGarden.com are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Please credit and link back to FieldandGarden.com as your source if sharing or publishing.

Public Domain Poetry for Gardeners and Nature Lovers: Who Taught the Birds? by Caris Brooke

British Birds: Cock Skylark; Hen Beam Bird; Hen White Wagtail; Hen Blackcap; Cock Nightingale; Hen Nightingale; Cock and hen house Martin; Cock Marsh Titmouse; Hen Titlark and a Hen Grass Hopper, painted 1736
by Charles Collins (1680 - 1744)

*** --- *** --- ***

WHO TAUGHT THE BIRDS?
by Caris Brooke
(originally published June 17, 1893)

To and fro, to and fro,
From the chestnut tree to the meadow grass,
Day after day I watched her pass;
Where did the little birdie go?
With drooping wing and ruffled breast,
Hopping along with a broken leg,
She came to my window, as if to beg
Crumbs for the little ones up in her nest.

Far and high, touching the sky
Where the chestnut flowers are pink and white,
Every morning and every night
She carried worms, or grubs, or fly,
To a nest that was woven of moss and feather,
Where the little bird-babies chirrup and cheep,
And over the nest-edge try to peep --
Five little yellow bills open together.

Slowly, in pain, in sunshine and rain,
The mother-bird went on her weary way;
But the little ones waited that summer day,
And chirruped and called for her -- all in vain.
I opened my window, and found her lain
Just where the sunlight touches the sill --
Not waiting for crumbs, but cold and still --
Never to fly to her nest again.

Little mouths to be fed, and their mother dead --
Must the poor wee birdies with hunger die?
Watching, I saw another bird fly
Straight to the nest with a crumb of bread.
To and fro, without staying to rest,
She carried them morsels of dainty food,
Till she satisfied all the hungry brood;
Then gathered them warmly under her breast.

* * * * *

Now tell me, Who had whispered to the little birdies's heart
To fly to those forsaken ones, and take their mother's part?

Creative Commons Licence
Public domain poem is fom my personal collection. All digitized poems by FieldandGarden.com are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Please credit and link back to FieldandGarden.com as your source if sharing or publishing.

Art for Inspiration: Still Life by José Gutiérrez Solana

Untitled, Still Life
by José Gutiérrez Solana (1886 - 1945)

Green is the prime color of the world, and that from which its loveliness arises.
Pedro Calderon de la Barca

This plant represents what's happening inside of you. The world, like the soil, is cold and dark—layered with a history of destruction and death. You were planted in this world to rise above it. Do you not see? The very existence of this darkness gives you the opportunity to become a light to the world.
Seth Adam Smith, Rip Van Winkle and the Pumpkin Lantern

Every living creature on this planet, has a conscious subjective perspective of the world. Even the plants may seem to us as standing indifferent to the human sufferings, but even they have their own unique mental universe. They have their own way of interacting with the environment.
Abhijit Naskar, What is Mind?

Public Domain Poetry for Gardeners and Nature Lovers: The Birds by Pierre-Jean de Béranger

The Bird Charmer, 1873
by Léon Bazille Perrault (1832 – 1908)

Happy who for a season may
Absent themselves on buoyant wing!
The birds that Winter drives away
Will surely come again with Spring.
They of our ills will mindful be,
And when at length the storm has passed,
They will return to this same tree
Which has so often felt the blast.
Then to our fertile vale will they
A more auspicious presage bring!
The birds that Winter drives away
Will surely come again with Spring.
Pierre-Jean de Béranger, The Birds (translated from the French by Percy Reeve)

Public Domain Nature Poem for Gardeners and Nature Lovers: Primrose Sweet by Samuel S. McCurry

Photo credit: Ella8 from Pixabay

Here is a public domain Victorian poem by Samuel S. McCurry entitled "Primrose Sweet," originally published in March of 1893. This is how it goes:

O Primrose Sweet! Of sun and shower
The offspring fair. Of glade and bower
We watch thy dainty leaves unfold
In fairy clouds of clustered gold,
When wintry skies no longer lower.

The earnest, thou, of Spring's bright dower;
For thee we longed the dreary hour,
When wailed the winds across the world,
O Primrose Sweet!

We hail thy coming, gentle flower!
And, yielding to the majestic power,
Love, Love, that erst was doubting, cold,
Shall pipe to thee a paean bold,
And Faith revived shall cease to cower,
Primrose Sweet!

Creative Commons Licence
Public domain poem is fom my personal collection. All digitized poems by FieldandGarden.com are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Please credit and link back to FieldandGarden.com as your source if sharing or publishing.