Victorian Clipart for Crafts, Collage, Scrapbooking or Card Making: A Balloonist in Spite of Herself

“No, no! The adventures first, explanations take such a dreadful time.”
― Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass

Whee! Here is a fun graphic for a wild and windy day like today (don't let your kids try this at home). A little girl, clutching an enormous umbrella that's seen better days, is being blown away by a mighty gust of wind. This black and white illustration originally appeared in the September 1875 issue of Frank Leslie's Lady's Magazine. You can download the 9" x 11" @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark here.

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Art for Inspiration: Innocence by Jennie Augusta Brownscombe

"Innocence, 1882"
by Jennie Augusta Brownscombe (1850 - 1936)

“When we are children we seldom think of the future. This innocence leaves us free to enjoy ourselves as few adults can. The day we fret about the future is the day we leave our childhood behind.”
― Patrick Rothfuss, The Name of the Wind

“How happy is the blameless vestal’s lot!
The world forgetting, by the world forgot.
Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind!
Each pray’r accepted, and each wish resign’d.”
― Alexander Pope, Eloisa to Abelard

“See the world through the eyes of your inner child.
The eyes that sparkle in awe and amazement as they see love, magic and mystery in the most ordinary things.”
― Henna Sohail

Whimsical Victorian Graphic for Crafts, Collage, Scrapbooking or Graphic Design: Overheard Between the Mice


A very sweet black and white illustration from 1901 that shows a mischievous girl garden fairy with butterfly wings, creeping up close to listen in on a couple of mice's whispered conversation as they huddle under a tangle of nasturtium leaves. I wonder what they are saying? You can download the high-res 4.5" x 6" @ 300 ppi JPG without a watermark for your crafts or graphic design project here.

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Antique Decorative Border for Journaling, Scrapbooking or Card Making: A Little Happier Journal Page or Card Template


This image was extracted from an art nouveau style vintage postcard in my personal collection. The decorative border shows an L-shaped row of stylized red poppies with a lush summer meadow and billowy clouds in the background. On the upper right side of the page is a little verse that says: "A little happier, a few more friends, A little richer, In the blessings Heaven sends..."

I think this would make a wonderful background for a journal or scrapbooking page but you could also use it in a greeting card project. You can download the high-res 12" x 12" @ 300 ppi JPEG here.

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Antique Garden Graphic for Crafts, Scrapooking or Card Making: A Spring Workman (Victorian Illustration)


This illustration was published in April 1874 and shows a small winged cherub with a paint palette and brush painting the colours onto a garden pansy, one of the first flowers to appear in spring. The caption that originally accompanied the drawing stated that this was "A Spring Workman (from a French picture)." You can download the high-res 3.75" x 6" @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark for crafts, collage, scrapbooking or art journaling projects here.

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Shabby Chic Vintage Postcard for Crafts, Collage or Scrapbooking: Swallows with Horseshoe-Shaped Rose Wreath


Shabby chic vintage postcard from 1909. The image shows two swallows with a horseshoe-shaped wreath made of roses and topped with a forget-me-not bow. The greeting reads:

"Brightly for you speed lifes gay hours,
And your pathway be blessed with Luck in rich showers."

Both the left and right borders of the card have brightly-coloured roses on a gold background.

To download the high-res 5" x 7.5" @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark, please click here. Great for sending to a friend or loved one but can also be used in scrapbooking or other graphic design projects.

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Vintage Graphic for Crafts, Scrapbooking, Card Making or Graphic Design: Victorian Girl Picking Garden Flowers


The original illustration came from a Victorian trade card in my personal collection. It shows a Victorian girl (about five or six years old) with a small posy in one gloved hand while in her other, she is holding a pink flower which she is leaning over to gently sniff at. She is wearing a crimson dress with white polka dots, and has thrown a tartan shawl about her shoulders and a muslin cap atop her curls to keep warm. I have added a floral background and a border to frame the original image. You can download a 5" x 7" @ 300 ppi copy of this greeting card without a watermark here.

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Antique Decorative Border for Journaling or Card Making: Art Nouveau Sundial with Garden Hollyhocks


An art nouveau style illustration from a vintage postcard dated December 27, 1916 in my personal collection. I love the depiction of the sundial and hollyhocks underneath a shady tree. It is such a quintessential cottage garden scene. I think this would make a really pretty greeting or invitation card but you could also use it as a background for journaling or scrapbooking. You can download the high-res 7" x 10" @ 300 ppi JPEG without any words here.

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Vintage Outdoor Graphic for Crafts, Scrapbooking, Card Making or Graphic Design: Elegant Parisian Lady in Simple Blue Dress Strolling by the Shore

Among the changing months, May stands confest;
The sweetest, and in fairest colors dressed.
― James Thomson

Antique outdoor graphic published in May 1898. This shows a Victorian lady strolling along the shore; she is wearing a simple yet elegant spring dress in a striking royal blue. You can download the high-res 6” x 11” @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark here for use in crafts, collage, scrapbooking or design projects.

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Vintage Graphic and Victorian Sheet Music for Crafts, Collage, Scrapbooking or Graphic Design: Bird with Spring Blossoms and Spring Bird Waltz


Hello, everyone. Two free graphics this morning:

(1) An illustration from one of my books on wild birds, published in 1901. This bird is called the chiffchaff (Phylloscopus collybita), its name derived "...from the fancied resemblance of its notes to the words 'chiff chaff,' which are uttered with a quick, clear enunciation; the song is sweet and not unmelodious, and when alarmed the bird has a note of displeasure which sounds something like the word 'whoo-id' or 'whoo-it.'

...considered the earliest of our summer visitors, arriving in this country [England] sometimes in March, and remaining until October; indeed, of all small warblers, it is the first to come and the last to go."

Download the 4" x 6" @ 300 ppi JPEG here.

(2) A light-hearted dance tune called "Spring Bird Waltz" from the August 1, 1858 issue of Young Ladies' Journal. You can download this antique sheet music as a 4" x 6" @ 300 ppi JPEG here.

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Public Domain Victorian Poem: Mother by M.M.D.


A poem simply entitled "Mother" by M.M.D. (I suspect it is Mary Mapes Dodge), published in October 1877. This is how it goes:

Early one summer morning,
I saw two children pass:
Their footsteps, slow yet lightsome,
Scarce bent the tender grass.

One, lately out of babyhood,
Looked up with eager eyes;
The other watched her wistfully,
Oppressed with smothered sighs.

"See, mother!" cried the little one,
"I gathered them for you?
The sweetest flowers and lilies,
And Mabel has some too."

"Hush, Nelly!" whispered Mabel,
"We have not reached it yet.
Wait till we get there, darling,
It isn't far, my pet."

"Get where?" asked Nelly. "Tell me."
"To the church-yard," Mabel said.
"No! no!" cried little Nelly,
And shook her sunny head.

Still Mabel whispered sadly,
"We must take them to the grave.
Come, darling?" and the childish voice
Tried to be clear and brave.

But Nelly still kept calling
Far up into the blue;
"See, mother, see, how pretty
We gathered them for you."

And when her sister pleaded,
She cried -- and would not go: --
"Angels don't live in church-yards,
My mother don't, I know."

Then Mabel bent and kissed her.
"So be it, dear," she said;
"We'll take them to the arbor
And lay them there instead."

"For mother loved it dearly,
It was the sweetest place!"
And the joy that came to Nelly
Shone up in Mabel's face.

I saw them turn, and follow
A path with blossoms bright,
Until the nodding branches
Concealed them from my sight;

But still like sweetest music
The words came ringing through;
"See, mother, see, how pretty
We gathered them for you."

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Vintage Graphic for Crafts, Collage, Scrapbooking or Graphic Design: Invited Guests or Young Lady with Wild Swans

“The river is such a tranquil place, a place to sit and think of romance and the beauty of nature, to enjoy the elegance of swans and the chance of a glimpse of a kingfisher.”
― Jane Wilson-Howarth, Snowfed Waters

First-generation digital scan of a black and white engraving from June 1893. The illustration shows a young Victorian lady in her rowboat under the weeping branches of a willow tree. She seems to be scattering some food for a pair of swans who are swimming towards her. The caption that initially appeared under the drawing (which has been removed) read "Invited Guests." You can download an 8" x 14" @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark here for use in crafts, collage, scrapbooking or design projects.

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Art for Inspiration: Mercie Cutting Flowers by Edmund Charles Tarbell

"Mercie Cutting Flowers, 1912"
by Edmund Charles Tarbell (1862 - 1938)

“In joy or sadness flowers are our constant friends.”
― Kakuzō Okakura, The Book Of Tea

“I read somewhere once that souls were like flowers,' said Priscilla.
'Then your soul is a golden narcissus,' said Anne, 'and Diana's is like a red, red rose. Jane's is an apple blossom, pink and wholesome and sweet.'
'And our own is a white violet, with purple streaks in its heart,' finished Priscilla.”
― L.M. Montgomery, Anne of Avonlea

Happiness held is the seed; Happiness shared is the flower.
― John Harrigan

Vintage Printable for Collage, Scrapbooking or Card Making: Cottage by the Sea Cheer-up Card (Digital Ephemera, Instant Download)


A charming vintage greeting postcard from c1910. It shows a cottage by the sea with a lushly blooming garden. There is a winding path between the cottage and the beach on which someone is traveling along in a horse-drawn buggy. A short poem reads:

If 't were only in my power
To make all good things come true,
Then I'd start this very hour
And bring happiness to you.

You can download a free 5" x 7.5" @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark here for collage, scrapbooking, card making or graphic design peojects.

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Free Vintage Graphic for Collage, DIY Wall Art, Scrapbooking or Card Making: Young Girl with a Cup of Flowers


“You don't need an entire garden bed, to notice the beauty of a flower.”
― Nikki Rowe

An antique illustration from 1867 showing a young Victorian girl pouring water into a little tumbler with a small posy of wildflowers as the sunlight streams in through the open cottage window. You can download a free 8" x 11" @ 300 ppi high-res JPEG without a watermark here for collage, DIY wall art, scrapbooking, card making or graphic design.

For framing, I recommend printing on good quality, heavyweight cardstock or on heavy, matte photo paper using waterproof or archival inks. If you are using watercolour paper, I would use hot-pressed paper over cold-pressed. If in doubt, please consult your printer manual or bring the file to a reputable printing company to have your image processed.

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Art for Inspiration: The Edge of the Woods by Charles Courtney Curran

"The Edge of the Woods, 1912"
by Charles Courtney Curran (1861 - 1942)

The woods are lovely, dark and deep. But I have promises to keep, and miles to go before I sleep.
― Robert Frost

The starting point of discovering who you are, your gifts, your talents, your dreams, is being comfortable with yourself. Spend time alone. Write in a journal. Take long walks in the woods.
― Robin S. Sharma

“We walked always in beauty, it seemed to me. We walked and looked about, or stood and looked. Sometimes, less often, we would sit down. We did not often speak. The place spoke for us and was a kind of speech. We spoke to each other in the things we saw.”
― Wendell Berry, Jayber Crow

Art for Inspiration: The Quiet of the Lake, Roundhay Park by John Atkinson Grimshaw

"The Quiet of the Lake, Roundhay Park, 1870"
by John Atkinson Grimshaw (1836 - 1893)

“You cannot wait for an untroubled world to have an untroubled moment. The terrible phone call, the rainstorm, the sinister knock on the door—they will all come. Soon enough arrive the treacherous villain and the unfair trial and the smoke and the flames of the suspicious fires to burn everything away. In the meantime, it is best to grab what wonderful moments you find lying around.”
― Lemony Snicket, Shouldn't You Be in School?

Art for Inspiration: Untitled Landscape by Richard Heintz

Untitled Landscape
by Richard Heintz (1871 – 1929)

“Distance changes utterly when you take the world on foot. A mile becomes a long way, two miles literally considerable, ten miles whopping, fifty miles at the very limits of conception. The world, you realize, is enormous in a way that only you and a small community of fellow hikers know. Planetary scale is your little secret.

Life takes on a neat simplicity, too. Time ceases to have any meaning. When it is dark, you go to bed, and when it is light again you get up, and everything in between is just in between. It’s quite wonderful, really.

You have no engagements, commitments, obligations, or duties; no special ambitions and only the smallest, least complicated of wants; you exist in a tranquil tedium, serenely beyond the reach of exasperation, “far removed from the seats of strife,” as the early explorer and botanist William Bartram put it. All that is required of you is a willingness to trudge.

There is no point in hurrying because you are not actually going anywhere. However far or long you plod, you are always in the same place: in the woods. It’s where you were yesterday, where you will be tomorrow. The woods is one boundless singularity. Every bend in the path presents a prospect indistinguishable from every other, every glimpse into the trees the same tangled mass. For all you know, your route could describe a very large, pointless circle. In a way, it would hardly matter.

At times, you become almost certain that you slabbed this hillside three days ago, crossed this stream yesterday, clambered over this fallen tree at least twice today already. But most of the time you don’t think. No point. Instead, you exist in a kind of mobile Zen mode, your brain like a balloon tethered with string, accompanying but not actually part of the body below. Walking for hours and miles becomes as automatic, as unremarkable, as breathing. At the end of the day you don’t think, “Hey, I did sixteen miles today,” any more than you think, “Hey, I took eight-thousand breaths today.” It’s just what you do.”
― Bill Bryson, A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail

Art for Inspiration: Rhubarb by Nikolai Astrup

"Rhubarb, 1911"
by Nikolai Astrup (1880 - 1928)

“The master of the garden is the one who waters it, trims the branches, plants the seeds, and pulls the weeds. If you merely stroll through the garden, you are but an acolyte.”
― Vera Nazarian, The Perpetual Calendar of Inspiration

It often happens to children - and sometimes to gardeners - that they are given gifts of value of which they do not perceive until much later.
― Wayne Winterrowd

There is a garden in every childhood, an enchanted place where colors are brighter, the air softer, and the morning more fragrant than ever again.
― Elizabeth Lawrence

Art for Inspiration: Fruit Garden in Szentendre by Vilmos Perlrott-Csaba

"Fruit Garden in Szentendre, c1920"
by Vilmos Perlrott-Csaba (1880 - 1955)

“To be poor and be without trees, is to be the most starved human being in the world. To be poor and have trees, is to be completely rich in ways that money can never buy.”
― Clarissa Pinkola Estés, The Faithful Gardener: A Wise Tale About That Which Can Never Die

“...trees to cool the towns in the boiling summer, trees to hold back the winter winds. There were so many things a tree could do: add color, provide shade, drop fruit, or become a children's playground, a whole sky universe to climb and hang from; an architecture of food and pleasure, that was a tree. But most of all the trees would distill an icy air for the lungs, and a gentle rustling for the ear when you lay nights in your snowy bed and were gentled to sleep by the sound.”
― Ray Bradbury, The Martian Chronicles

Art for Inspiration: A Rooftop with Flowers by Joaquín Sorolla

"A Rooftop with Flowers, 1906"
by Joaquín Sorolla (1863 – 1923)

Every time I imagine a garden in an architectural setting, it turns into a magical place. I think of gardens I have seen, that I believe I have seen, that I long to see, surrounded by simple walls, columns, arcades or the facades of buildings - sheltered places of great intimacy where I want to stay for a long time.
― Peter Zumthor

Art for Inspiration: The Bird Charmer by Léon Bazille Perrault

"The Bird Charmer, 1873" by
Léon Bazille Perrault (1832 – 1908)

Happy who for a season may
Absent themselves on buoyant wing!
The birds that Winter drives away
Will surely come again with Spring.
They of our ills will mindful be,
And when at length the storm has passed,
They will return to this same tree
Which has so often felt the blast.
Then to our fertile vale will they
A more auspicious presage bring!
The birds that Winter drives away
Will surely come again with Spring.
― Pierre-Jean de Béranger, The Birds (translated from the French by Percy Reeve)


Art for Inspiration: The Flower Girl by Herbert Gustave Schmalz

"The Flower Girl, 1900"
by Herbert Gustave Schmalz (1856 - 1935)

“For you little gardener and lover of trees, I have only a small gift. Here is set G for Galadriel, but it may stand for garden in your tongue. In this box there is earth from my orchard, and such blessing as Galadriel has still to bestow is upon it. It will not keep you on your road, nor defend you against any peril; but if you keep it and see your home again at last, then perhaps it may reward you. Though you should find all barren and laid waste, there will be few gardens in Middle-earth that will bloom like your garden, if you sprinkle this earth there. Then you may remember Galadriel, and catch a glimpse far off of Lórien, that you have seen only in our winter. For our spring and our summer are gone by, and they will never be seen on earth again save in memory.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

Art for Inspiration: Mountain Landscape by Alfred H. Maurer

"Mountain Landscape, c1925"
by Alfred H. Maurer (1868 – 1932)

“Faeries, come take me out of this dull world,
For I would ride with you upon the wind,
Run on the top of the dishevelled tide,
And dance upon the mountains like a flame.”
― W.B. Yeats, The Land of Heart's Desire

“Mountains seem to answer an increasing imaginative need in the West. More and more people are discovering a desire for them, and a powerful solace in them. At bottom, mountains, like all wildernesses, challenge our complacent conviction - so easy to lapse into - that the world has been made for humans by humans. Most of us exist for most of the time in worlds which are humanly arranged, themed and controlled. One forgets that there are environments which do not respond to the flick of a switch or the twist of a dial, and which have their own rhythms and orders of existence. Mountains correct this amnesia. By speaking of greater forces than we can possibly invoke, and by confronting us with greater spans of time than we can possibly envisage, mountains refute our excessive trust in the man-made. They pose profound questions about our durability and the importance of our schemes. They induce, I suppose, a modesty in us.”
― Robert Macfarlane, Mountains of the Mind: Adventures in Reaching the Summit

“I like the mountains because they make me feel small,' Jeff says. 'They help me sort out what's important in life.”
― Mark Obmascik, Halfway to Heaven: My White-knuckled--and Knuckleheaded--Quest for the Rocky Mountain High

Art for Inspiration: The Hospice in Leyden by Max Liebermann

The Hospice in Leyden, 1890
by Max Liebermann (1847 - 1935)

“You know what the doctor said to me to cheer me up?" Fat said. "There are worse diseases than cancer."
"Did he show you slides?"
We both laughed. When you are nearly crazy with grief, you laugh at what you can.”
― Philip K. Dick, VALIS

“As my sufferings mounted I soon realized that there were two ways in which I could respond to my situation -- either to react with bitterness or seek to transform the suffering into a creative force. I decided to follow the latter course.”
― Martin Luther King Jr.

“Illness is the night side of life, a more onerous citizenship. Everyone who is born holds dual citizenship, in the kingdom of the well and in the kingdom of the sick. Although we all prefer to use the good passport, sooner or later each of us is obliged, at least for a spell, to identify ourselves as citizens of that other place.”
― Susan Sontag, Illness as Metaphor

Art for Inspiration: A Young Beauty Holding a Vase of Orchids by Thomas Francis Dicksee

"A Young Beauty Holding a Vase of Orchids, 1886"
by Thomas Francis Dicksee (1819 - 1895)

“Many collectors died in process of searching for new species, and despite persistent reports that the men died from drowning, gunshot and knife wounds, snakebite, trampling by cattle, or blows in the head with blunt instruments, it is generally accepted that in each case the primary cause of death was orchid fever.”
― Eric Hansen, Orchid Fever: A Horticultural Tale of Love, Lust, and Lunacy

Public Domain Poetry for Kids: Cheery Robin by B. Lander (Victorian Children's Poem)

Image source: Wikimedia

The following is a public domain Victorian children's poem written by B. Lander and originally published in 1880. The poem is called "Cheery Robin" and this is how it goes:

Robin in the April time
Blithely sings of summer prime,
Every mellow note outwelling
Sweetly telling of his glee;
How his merry carol rings!
As he sings,
In the budding April time, -- Cheerily!

Robin in the summer prime,
What cares he for autumn rime!
Present care and present pleasure
Fill the measure of each day;
And his merry carol rings,
While he sings,
In the golden summer prime, -- Cheerily!

Robins in the autumn rime
Singeth of a sunny clime,
Where the bowers glow with flowers,
Where the hours brim with glee.
Still his merry carol rings!
Still he sings,
In the chilly autumn rime, -- Cheerily!

Robin to the aged Year
Sings a parting note of cheer;
Happy heart of sunshine, Robin,
Ever throbbing merrily.
Sweet contentment Robin brings,
When he sings,
With a cadence loud and clear, -- Cheerily!

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Keywords: 1800s, 1880, 19th century, antique, bird song, cheer, contentment, happiness, nature, poem, poetry for kids, singing robin, Victorian, vintage

Art for Inspiration: The Lady of the Lake by Henry John Yeend King

“The Lady of the Lake” by Henry John Yeend King (1855 – 1924)

“Water does not resist. Water flows. When you plunge your hand into it, all you feel is a caress. Water is not a solid wall, it will not stop you. But water always goes where it wants to go, and nothing in the end can stand against it. Water is patient. Dripping water wears away a stone. Remember that, my child. Remember you are half water. If you can't go through an obstacle, go around it. Water does.”
― Margaret Atwood, The Penelopiad

“Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it. The river was cut by the world's great flood and runs over rocks from the basement of time. On some of the rocks are timeless raindrops. Under the rocks are the words, and some of the words are theirs.
I am haunted by waters.”
― Norman Maclean, A River Runs Through It and Other Stories

“Have you also learned that secret from the river; that there is no such thing as time?" That the river is everywhere at the same time, at the source and at the mouth, at the waterfall, at the ferry, at the current, in the ocean and in the mountains, everywhere and that the present only exists for it, not the shadow of the past nor the shadow of the future.”
― Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha